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Terri Agnew's Personal Meeting Room - Shared screen with speaker view
Kavouss Arasteh
42:12
HiGAC PARTICIPANTS PLS IDENTIFY YOURSELVES
Kavouss Arasteh
43:52
I am sure that Jorge is there?hi Jorge
Alexander Schubert
45:12
Reserved on Top-Level?
Julie Hedlund
45:16
One of the Julies :-)
Julie Bisland
45:32
One of us will answer!
Julie Hedlund
45:44
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Q6_DxsCvSA_3B7ArncO2U4tWNY3vH7Wi4nINrouR4AI/edit?usp=sharing
Julie Hedlund
47:14
Additional references: https://newgtlds.icann.org/sites/default/files/agreements/agreement-approved-31jul17-en.htmlhttps://newgtlds.icann.org/en/applicants/agb/evaluation-procedures-04jun12-en.pdf
Heather Forrest
49:47
Red Cross is now winding up implementation - all done
Heather Forrest
50:07
IGO/INGO is under temporary protections, but yes, work underway in another PPD
Heather Forrest
50:10
PDP
Alexander Schubert
50:16
Shouldn't we distinguish between "ineligble" strings and "reserved" for other parties?
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
51:05
We have heard you on this CW you have been clear all along
Susan Payne
51:58
Heather/Susan we're interchangeable apparently
Heather Forrest
52:15
I haven't been involved in the Spec 13 discussions, sorry.
Maxim Alzoba
52:22
Hello All
Maxim Alzoba
52:35
sorry for being bit late
Jim Prendergast
53:20
Alexander raises an interesting point "Shouldn't we distinguish between "ineligble" strings and "reserved" for other parties?"
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
54:27
probably worthy of doing so @Jim/Alexander
Jim Prendergast
55:21
its not mine - its Alexanders...
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
56:11
noted @Jim
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
56:57
(sorry I am navigating/engageing in 2 zoom rooms/calls at once ;-)
Heather Forrest
58:05
You have made very important distinction, Jeff (difference between reserved for non-use by anyone, or reserved for use by a particular, designated party- thanks for making the point so we know exactly what we're dealing with.
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
01:00:59
That list exists Yes
Maxim Alzoba
01:01:14
reserved from being registered
Susan Payne
01:02:23
actually reserved doesn't have the definition that you attribute Christopher.
Julie Hedlund
01:04:20
I’ve been forgetting again to put up the timer. I’ll do so now. I’ve tried to find smaller timers without ads, but haven’t found anything that works better.
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
01:04:48
thanks Julie
Christopher Wilkinson
01:06:34
@Jeff - Yes +Whois Rdds, rdap etc.
Jeff Neuman (Com Laude Group)
01:06:53
Thanks all....that is my thinking
Justine Chew
01:06:56
Agree with Martin
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
01:10:22
quick online dictionary search shows.... "As a verb, to reserve is to stash something away or to set it aside for future use. ... Reserve is also used as a verb to mean "obtain in advance."
Martin Sutton
01:11:01
+1 Kavouss
Maxim Alzoba
01:16:42
they might not need DNS at all
Greg Shatan
01:16:52
I would support the RySG new idea. We need to clarify what’s “off the table” in the next round.
Kavouss Arasteh
01:17:01
Jeff or Christopher, BSI stands for pls?
Justine Chew
01:17:12
@Jeff, could you please confirm if .corp, .home and .mail fall under any bullets points currently?
Maxim Alzoba
01:17:35
why blockchain ‘currencies’ need DNS at all?
Jeff Neuman (Com Laude Group)
01:18:31
@kavouss - I believe it is a typo...I believe it is supposed to refer to the Bank of International Settlements, but I could be wrong. Christopher made the proposal.
Maxim Alzoba
01:18:48
such ‘currencies’ are recognized not in all jurisdictions, to say more, in some places it is a crime to use those
Kavouss Arasteh
01:19:25
Then what BIS stands for pls?
Jeff Neuman (Com Laude Group)
01:19:45
All - I am giving Christopher some more time to discuss the proposal since he is the author
Jeff Neuman (Com Laude Group)
01:20:04
Bank of International Settlements
Maxim Alzoba
01:20:06
2 minutes rule?
Justine Chew
01:21:08
@Maxim, not to mention that the exchange or transaction of some bypass the DNS altogether.
Martin Sutton
01:22:50
But the application includes identifying purposes
Kristine Dorrain (Amazon Registry)
01:23:00
what damage do we see?
Martin Sutton
01:23:31
And objections can be raised - so if financial purpose, we are likely to see GAC early warning and certain requirements applied
Martin Sutton
01:23:43
Particularly with highly regulated services
Maxim Alzoba
01:24:22
most probably GAC members will raise concerns if their currency is use … 3letter country codes will not fly, for example .COM is not Comoros Islands
Maxim Alzoba
01:25:36
Central Banks, who are eligible to be the currency ‘owner’ will not contract ICANN (due to being regulated quite a lot)
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
01:26:25
Yes @ Jeff I appreciated that example when you shared it with the email list
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
01:26:48
of narrowest focus of regulatory or light tugh approach
Jeff Neuman (Com Laude Group)
01:27:48
There is a .forex, correct?
Justine Chew
01:28:50
We (concluded?) that national law doesn't apply to applicants which are not based in that jurisdiction. So the "national law" may not be that useful for this purposes.
Martin Sutton
01:29:23
example - USD
Heather Forrest
01:29:24
Even leaving aside the role of national law, we're not on solid ground to be taking preventative action unless there's a clear risk of confusion. I haven't heard yet in this discussion anything that suggests that a currency code used as a TLD is somehow going to confuse with the currency
Martin Sutton
01:29:26
GBP
Greg Shatan
01:30:13
It’s an ISO standard. Each world currency is assigned a unique 3 letter code.
Greg Shatan
01:30:39
163 codes I believe
Martin Sutton
01:30:55
IRT
Greg Shatan
01:31:17
I think Jeff is right.
Justine Chew
01:32:46
Verified at both TL and SL?
Greg Shatan
01:34:06
There are 162 active Currency Codes. There are also obsolete and old Euro-zone codes.
Heather Forrest
01:34:50
I suspect Justine means top and second level
Greg Shatan
01:37:14
ALL, BAM, BOB, CAD, COP, CUP, IMP, IRR, MAD, PEN, PHP, RON, RUB, SOS would all be barred
Greg Shatan
01:40:50
Well, then this is like looking for your lost car keys under the streetlight, rather than where you dropped them....
Maxim Alzoba
01:40:55
but who will be eligible? Central Banks, but they will not contract ICANN
Maxim Alzoba
01:41:40
so far those currencies do not use TLDs
Martin Sutton
01:42:10
I think the reason for 3 char country codes being reserved is due to the fact that there is no agreement as to who can apply.
Maxim Alzoba
01:42:43
I am not sure they are reserved
Maxim Alzoba
01:42:57
for example 3 letter for Comoros is COM
Greg Shatan
01:43:09
We can trade the Argentine peso at .ARS. (To be spelled out, not pronounced)
Martin Sutton
01:43:18
Theyb are under the geo terms - .com got through before the AGB
Martin Sutton
01:43:26
long before
Greg Shatan
01:43:58
Wait til Comoros realise they have a hot commodity...
Martin Sutton
01:45:19
I don’t recall any risks that Comoros have been concerned with over the years .com has operated, but interested to know
Justine Chew
01:46:44
Under WT5, I had raised the possibility of countries whose 3-letter ISO 3166-1 country code had already been delegated be allowed assignment of another 3-letter country code as "compensation". But that was WT5 and not taken up.
Heather Forrest
01:46:59
Isn't this context dependent at the second level? We can't have a general rule at second level
Alexander Schubert
01:47:10
No problem
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
01:47:16
Good catch @Alexander :-)
Justine Chew
01:48:13
O2
Justine Chew
01:51:57
Would a sublist of two-character TLD which match any ccTLD work?
Justine Chew
01:52:58
To draw notice that string confusion risk is higher
Maxim Alzoba
01:53:22
1 and l and i Capital
Greg Shatan
01:53:30
Homoglyphs!
Jeff Neuman (Com Laude Group)
01:55:12
@Alexander - I understand you :)
Alexander Schubert
01:55:25
letter/letter and two-letter are identical!
Heather Forrest
01:55:47
Given that the potential problem is so limited, and we haven't as yet identified a likely risk of confusion, isn't the best way to handle this through a Module 3 objection ground?
Heather Forrest
01:58:39
@Alexandr - the historic argument against the distinction point you've just made is that there are many ccTLDs operating essentially as generics (.co, .nu, etc) so the ccs themselves have already broken that distinction
Justine Chew
01:59:16
@Heather, who is "we"? A number of comments have raised possible confusion, do we disregard them?
Maxim Alzoba
01:59:23
+1 , but ccTLDs are free to do anything they find fit
Alexander Schubert
01:59:24
There are two letter strings and two CHARACTER strings. A letter is a-z and a Character is a-z plus 0-9!
Heather Forrest
02:00:00
@Alexander - I misunderstood your point, then - I thought you were arguing that 2 characters signals a cc
Christopher Wilkinson
02:00:29
Must explicit Two Characters, not Two Letters only.
Alexander Schubert
02:00:43
Yes: a two character gTLD would signal membership in the ccTLD club!
Heather Forrest
02:00:54
@Justine - sorry, I was thinking more along the lines of the legal standard of likelihood of confusion. Likelihood of confusion is differentiated from possibility of confusion.
Heather Forrest
02:01:12
Ie, just because it's possible doesn't mean it's likely in the context of the circumstances
Maxim Alzoba
02:01:22
registries can reserve unlimited number, please do not conflate with 100 strings a TLD can use for itself
Martin Sutton
02:01:24
@Heather - good reminder that numerous ccTLD operate as a gTLD
Alexander Schubert
02:02:13
Btw: Two NUMBER gTLD strings at top level (like .69) won't work anyways as a 4th level domains could be a IP address: 1.1.1.69
Maxim Alzoba
02:04:21
It is not accurate
Maxim Alzoba
02:04:41
I mean that Reserved names used during the Sunrise, it is a greneralization
Maxim Alzoba
02:05:09
GEOs had to reserve names due to a non working ALP process
Susan Payne
02:05:13
Ireland is blocked at the top level
Maxim Alzoba
02:05:37
new hand
Maxim Alzoba
02:08:04
it came from informal discussion of ICANN and .london
Maxim Alzoba
02:08:34
it is used, not just going to be used
Julie Bisland
02:09:44
Next call: Monday, 19 August 2019 at 20:00 UTC for 90 minutes.
Cheryl Langdon-Orr
02:10:24
Bye Thanks